• What is ice-cream made of? Just as you would guess, most ice creams are made with frozen cream, combined with sugar, milk and different inclusions to make each yummy flavour.
  • Who eats the most ice cream? On average, each person in the UK eats around 7 litres of ice cream every year - which seems like a lot!  However - compare that with around 14 litres per person per year enjoyed in Finland and 27 litres in America. New Zealanders seem to love ice cream the most, eating around 28 litres each a year!
  • Did you know?  People in Scotland and Northern Ireland eat more ice cream on average than those in England and Wales.
  • According to research, men are more likely to choose ice cream as a dessert than women. Is that the same with your family?!
  • Lickalicious! Surveys say it takes an average of 50 licks to finish a single scoop of ice cream. How many licks does it take you?!
  • The most popular ice cream topping is chocolate syrup. What’s your favourite?
  • Fantastic Flavours! The most popular flavours tend to be Vanilla, Chocolate, Strawberry, Honeycomb Delight and Mint Choc Chip. However, the possibilities are endless! Yarde Farm have over 50 flavours to choose from, including ones like Jaffa Cake, Sherry Trifle and even Lime & Chilli for the brave! (Look at our list of luxury ice cream flavours here). In Japan, less tasty-sounding ones like octopus, cow-tongue, horse meat and kelp flavour ice cream have been made. Would you like to try those? What flavour would you invent?
  • Moo! One dairy cow can produce enough milk for 34,000 litres of ice cream in her lifetime!
  • In 1984, President Ronald Reagan designated July as National Ice Cream Month and the third Sunday of the month as National Ice Cream Day in America. As a treat enjoyed by 90 percent of the nation's population President Reagan called for everyone in the United States to celebrate with "appropriate ceremonies and activities."  We think that’s a great idea and should be held worldwide!
  • The biggest ever Ice Cream Sundae was made in Edmonton in Alberta, Canada, in 1988, weighing over 24 tonnes!
  • The busiest day for ice cream sellers is usually Sunday.
  • A popular story links the ice cream cone's invention to the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis. One version tells how a Syrian ice cream vendor called Ernest E. Hamwi reportedly didn't have enough dishes to keep up with the demand, so he teamed up with a waffle vendor who rolled his waffles into cones!  However, other research says cones were an English invention. The first record of cones being used to serve ice cream was in Mrs Marshall's Cookery Book in 1888.  The World's Fair in St. Louis certainly seemed to popularise the practice.
  • What happened before ice cream cones were invented? Ice cream used to be either licked out of a small glass known as a "penny lick" before being quickly washed and passed to the next person (very unhygienic!) or wrapped in a kind of waxed paper known as a "hokey pokey".
  • Food for thought...Cones are an environmentally friendly choice of packaging for your ice cream as you eat it all, so there's no waste!
  • Ice cream vans can only play their tunes between 12 noon and 7pm, for under 12 seconds each time, and at intervals no less than 2 minutes, not more than once every 2 hours in a particular length of street, never in sight of another ice cream van, and not when closer than 50m to a school during school hours, place of worship at times of worship, or hospital. Phewee!! If they break these laws, they could be taken to court and fined for noise pollution.
  • Have you ever had Ice cream “Brain Freeze”? This is a headache which normally lasts about 20 seconds, starting about 10 seconds after you’ve gobbled some ice cream too fast! When the ice cream touches the roof of your mouth (palate) or when swallowing, it causes blood vessels in the head to constrict and dilate and you get something called ‘referred pain’. The scientific name for Brain Freeze (aka. "Ice Cream Headache") is sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia. The easiest way to prevent it is to enjoy your ice cream nice and slowly…
  • Ice cream sales tend to increase many times during wars and recessions. Ice cream helps to make people happier even at difficult times.
  • Ever wondered how the British dessert "Knickerbocker Glory" got its name? Some say it was inspired by the shape of the Knickerbocker Glory glass resembling the tapered knee-length knickerbocker britches that used to be worn by female tennis players and men and boys for sports such as fencing and golf. Knickerbockers themselves were first known to be worn by Dutch settlers who arrived in New York in the 1600s.
  • Very versatile - Ice cream can be served in a cone, in a tub, in a bowl, in a glass, with lots of different types of toppings, sauces and wafers, as a sundae, in a banana split, with a cake, beside all sorts of puddings and desserts, with fruit, with pancakes, crepes or waffles, in a brioche or cookie sandwich, in drinks such as ice cream sodas, ice cream floats, milkshakes and smoothies, as part of an Affagato with liqueur or in cocktails…Can you think of any more?

We hope you have enjoyed these Fun Ice Cream Facts and they have helped you learn about ice cream and answered some of your questions!

The above information has come from various sources and we cannot guarantee that it is accurate or up to date - but hopefully so!